How to Make Kefir Video

I am sure you have heard of yogurt but have you heard about kefir?

Kefir has even more probiotic potential than yogurt – it is like yogurt on steroids! While yogurt normally has 5 – 7 strains of bacteria, kefir has 50+ strains of beneficial bacteria to nourish your body.

Kefir is not as thick as yogurt and can be drunk plain but also makes a wonderful smoothie. While kefir alone has a twang to it, when blended with fruit and honey it is difficult to tell the difference between it and a smoothie made with yogurt. So, whether you have it plain or as a smoothie, it is a refreshing probiotic drink.

From my affiliate partner you can purchase Kefir grains, which look like little cauliflower pieces, are needed to make kefir. The grains are a mix of yeast and bacteria living in a symbiotic relationship. Since the grains multiply, it is very easy to obtain some from a friend who already makes kefir – if you have one. Otherwise, they are available online. If properly cared for, they should last indefinitely. If you need a break from kefir making, the grains may be rinsed and refrigerated in non-chlorinated water (chlorine will kill them). I have even read that they can be frozen for future use but have not tried it.

Like most things, homemade kefir is tastier and more economical than its store bought counterpart. With homemade kefir, you get the taste you prefer because the twang is determined by the length of time you leave the grains in the milk.

Milk kefir grains may also be used to make coconut milk kefir. Follow the same procedure as shown in the video just be sure to revitalize the grains in dairy milk for 24 hours every few weeks to maintain their health.

Watch the video yourself to see just how easy kefir is to make – below the video is the recipe.

Kefir Recipe

Ingredients to make 1 quart:

4 c whole milk (we use raw milk from our family milk cow, Buttercup)

2 – 4 Tbsp kefir grains (from my affiliate -where to buy)

Other items needed:

1 qt mason jar, lid or cheesecloth to cover jar loosely, mesh strainer, spatula

Directions:

Put the kefir grains in a 1 qt mason jar.

Pour whole milk over the grains leaving about 1 inch space at the top of the jar.

Stir the milk and grains and cover loosely.

Leave in a warm place for 12 – 24 hrs. – depending on the taste you prefer. The kefir grains culture the milk and the longer it is left the tangier it will become. I leave mine on the kitchen counter for 24 hours. If it has separated and there is a bit of liquid on the bottom, I shake it before straining.

Pour the kefir through a  strainer into another jar catching the grains in the strainer. Refrigerate and enjoy.

 

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Comments

  1. I love kefir and we have a kefir smoothie every day for lunch. I do have a question……In the past few months, I notice that my grains are really not multiplying very much. If they are… it is at a REALLY slow pace….. yet, they are still making good kefir.
    I was wondering if you knew why this might be happening?
    Thanks

    • Do you rinse the grains daily? If I see mine not quite as plump as normal, I rinse every other day for a few days and they perk up. Also, make sure you are using whole milk and non-chlorinated water to rinse them.

    • Kefir grains multiply quicker in warmer areas therefore you’ll see them grow more rapidly during summer months. It doesn’t mean the kefir won’t work during cooler months. It will. Grains just don’t multiply as fast.

      I’ve never rinsed mine in the 2 (or more) years I’ve had them & I drain them daily. Never had any issues with them either.

      • Terrie, that is great that your grains have been healthy for so long! From my reading, it is recommended to rinse them and if I don’t for a long period of time, they begin to make kefir which tastes “off”.

  2. I never knew that you should rinse kefir grains! Interesting. Do you leave your kefir milk out to ferment at room temp for another day or do you put it directly into the fridge? I enjoyed your film. Thank you.

    • Yolanda, I strain the grains and refrigerate the kefir. I know some people leave it another day but it is a bit too tart – I also make and use a gallon per day and already have so many jars out with ferments going! ;)

  3. We live in Hawaii about 5 months of the year and in MI the rest of the time. When we leave MI, I freeze my kefir grains in raw milk. When we return, I thaw the grains in the milk and then drain the grains. It takes about 3 days of making kefir again before the kefir tastes like it usually does. I have a friend who has had her grains for 30 yrs. She takes them whenever she travels, even on planes. When using air travel, she drains and rinses the grains before going through security. Then she puts them in water until she gets to her destination.

  4. Hi Dina-Marie, I’m Anne from Life on the Funny Farm (http://annesfunnyfarm.blogspot.com), and I’m visiting from Farmgirl Friday.

    I remember kefir from our time spent in Kazakhstan (3 of our kids are from Kaz, 3 are “homegrown”). It was very popular there. I know my kids would love to have some again, so thanks for posting this. If you’ve never visited yet, I hope you can pop by my blog sometime to say hi…

  5. Kefir is sooooo easy. Thanks for sharing on GAPS Friendly Friday, Dina-Marie!

  6. Great video Dina! Hope you are having a great weekend and thank you so much for sharing with Full Plate Thursday.
    Come Back Soon!
    Miz Helen

  7. Wow. I have never heard of this. Thanks for the great tutorial, and thanks for linking up on Gluten-Free Monday at OneCreativeMommy.com.

  8. I have heard of kefir and I was really interested to learn more. This is an excellent post – really informative and helpful!

  9. I have been thinking about dabbling in some homemade yogurt but you have talked me into kefir. Thanks so much for sharing on Thursdays Treasures.

  10. Hey Dina,

    Enjoyed the video. In the several years I have been making kefir from the grains I have never rinsed mine. In the extensive information I researched before I started it actually advised not to rinse them. Obviously, they still work even if you rinse them and the rinse water is definitely a make-or-break deal. Also, you stated NOT to use ultra-pasteurized milk. I have no access to raw milk, and the only organic I can find is ultra-pasteurized. I’ve been using it for several years now and it makes perfect kefir. My little kefir-babies are definitely not starving! They are plump and fat!

    It is helpful to only make up the amount you can use each day. That way you don’t have jars and jars in the fridge and trying to keep them used up in the order they were made. Daily, I make enough for us to drink, for our kefir-ranch dressing, the five cats and the dog, and the 40 chickens. Kefir is the easiest health food you can make! I lived in Turkey for two years and “kefir” means “feel good” in Turkish. Perfect description.

    • Thanks, Babsy, I appreciate your input! I had read that ultra-pastureized milk did not have enough nutrients to sustain the kefir grains. I agree about making enough for your daily use but it does keep in the refrigerator nicely – we use a gallon per day and sometimes I give it to the family milk cows when their rumen is out of sorts.

  11. I have enjoyed “getting to know you” online. I watched the video above and it makes me wish we lived closer in real life. :) We too have a family cow, Buttercup. I love your Polish pottery dishes as well. Thanks for all the good information you put out there.

  12. Is there a way to make kefir without milk? I have dairy issues.

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